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Hardy, AR  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Hardy, Arkansas. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Heath Funeral Home Oak Hill Chapel
Highway 62 412 West
Hardy , AR
(870) 856-5656
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Circulation manager loved people

Wed, Feb 29, 2012
Lou." He would hate anyone calling him Mr. Lambert. It didn't matter if he knew you two years, two weeks or two days, if strangers crossed his path they were given a hardy "hello," a big smile and a question: "Do you read The Commercial Appeal?" His love of people was obvious. His love of the newspaper was infectious. The 57-year-old circulation manager for The Commercial Appeal died at his home Thursday. He joined The Com... (The Commercial Appeal)

That Great Big Jewish Land - Moment Magazine

Sun, Jan 15, 2012
Great, sighted Alaska on a 1741 trip to map the Siberian coast. Decades later came the promyshlenniki—Russian fur traders and businessmen lured by Alaska’s untapped natural wealth. Among these hardy souls, it is believed, were Jewish furriers and Jews who had been exiled to Siberia by the Tsar. Most worked for the state-sponsored trading concern called the Russian-American Company, which had a monopoly on exploiting Alaska’s vast resources. One of its managers was Nikolay Yakovlevich Rosenberg, who ran the company from 1850 to 1853.New Archangel—renamed Sitka—a harbor town on an island off the southeast coast, was the center of Alaskan commercial life. The first Jewish family arrived in 1848, says Moss. Alexander Cohen, whose daughters would become the state’s first postmistresses, bought two or three hotels and a brewery. The Cohens were followed by other Ashkenazi Jews from Germany who opened up a variety of businesses, including brothels. “Jews transformed Sitka from a tent city into a city,” says Moss.Jewish traders from San Francisco who purchased furs from the Russian-American Company were among the first to recognize Alaska’s potential. “While historians differed as to the real motives for the sale of Alaska, there was substantial agreement that the efforts of the San Francisco fur syndicates to buy out the Russian-American Company was a factor in bringing about the purchase,” wrote Bernard Postal, author of an authoritative article on Alaska’s Jews in the 1960 American Jewish Yearbook. Former California Senator Cornelius Cole, according to one Alaskan pioneer, recalled that “the original and most active mover of the plan to buy Alaska after the Civil War was an enterprising Jewish-American promoter and trader named Philip [sic] Goldstone of San Francisco.”Cole got Goldstone’s first name wrong but the rest of his facts were accurate. In 1865, Louis Goldstone, a California fur trader, brought news that the Russians wanted to sell Alaska to an American company. Facing competition from the British-owned Hudson Bay Company, Goldstone’s associates decided to pressure the American government to preempt the British. They engaged Cole, then a Washington lobbyist, to press his boyhood friend, U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward. And thus it was that on March 30, 1867 “Seward’s Folly”—the $7.2 million American purchase of Alaska—came to pass. At less than two cents an acre, it was a land that, unbeknownst to both seller and purchaser, harbored untold deposits of gold, silver, copper, zinc, coal and oil.Shortly after the U.S. purchase, two wealthy Jewish furriers in San Francisco Lewis Gerstle and Louis Sloss, bought most of the concessions owned by the Russian-American Company—23 trading posts strategically located on accessible islands and coastal plains, as well as its entire stock of goods, warehouses, wharves and ships—and folded them into their own firm, the Alaska Commercial Company. “A company agent was aboard the government transport carrying the American officials who took possession of Alaska on October 1, 1867,” wrote Postal. And so was soldier Benjamin Levy, who, according to his 1882 obituary in The American Israelite, was credited “with hauling down the Russian flag and hoisting up the Stars and Stripes when the formal transfer of sovereignty took place at Sitka.”In control of the new territory’s infrastructure, the Alaska Commercial Company had the inside track “in the race for commercial supremacy in Alaska,” wrote Postal. Gerstle and Sloss were particularly interested in sealskins, and also financed some of Alaska’s first mining ventures. But neither man ever set foot in the territory; they...

Stan Kulesa - Riverhead News-Review

Wed, Jan 11, 2012
Kyle, Ryan, Bryce and Quinn; his sister, Patricia Howell of Laurel, Md.; and his brother, James, of Riverhead. Stan was an architect, proud of working for world-class firms I.M. Pei, Cesar Pelli, Hardy Holtzman Pfeiffer Associates, Curt Fentress and others. He loved living in his condo in Denver with his family nearby. His hobbies were architecture, travel, photography, dining on filet mignon and reading the New York Times from cover to cover every day. He would not live in a city that didn’t deliver it. Stan’s sweet smile, compassion and sense of humor will be sorely missed. A memorial to celebrate Stan’s life will be held Saturday, Feb. 18, at 3 p.m. at First Unitarian Society of Denver, 14th and Lafayette St., Denver...

Miguel Terekhov, Dancer With Ballets Russes, Dies at 83

Tue, Jan 10, 2012
A sortable calendar of noteworthy cultural events in the New York region, selected by Times critics. The cause was complications of fibrosis of the lungs, said Camille Hardy, associate professor in the School of Dance. When Mr. Terekhov arrived at the university in 1963 it had only one dance course, a modern-dance class taught in the department of physical education. At his retirement in 1991, the School of Dance offered a wide range of courses in ballet, modern and other dance forms. Born in Montevideo, Uruguay, on Aug. 22, 1928, to Mikhail Terekhov, an immigrant from Ukraine, and Antonia Rodriguez, a Charraúa Indian, Mr. Terekhov became enamored of ballet at 7 when an aunt took him to a performance. He soon entered ballet school. But when he told his parents that he wished to become a professional dancer, his father objected, arguing that a dancer’s life was one of constant hardship. He... (New York Times)

The Personal Sting of Southgate/Mad Hatter Closings - Cincinnati CityBeat

Wed, Jan 4, 2012
Southgate House was like a rock. When I worked at the Levee, I often capped off a night at work with a trip to Southgate House. Awash in a sea of fake tans, short skirts and Ed Hardy shirts, the Southgate House is a bastion for authenticity in the area and I’m not sure that anything can fill that void. It was a place to escape the insanity of the Levee. After eight hours of dealing with drunk, high or just plain inconsiderate customers, having a place to sit down, drink a few memories away and enjoy some honky-tonk is immeasurably beneficial. If some new venue tries to copy or replace this feeling, I don’t know if I can ever accept it. There are rumors that Southgate House’s management and staff are opening a new venue in Newport, with the house receiving renovations. The Mad Hatter is slated to reopen under a new name and owner. I’ve been following the news and rumors swirling around both venues since they arose and began to take shape, but I still cannot pin down my feelings. On one hand, I agree with legendary local musician, David Rhodes Brown, who said that it is not a building that creates a community, but the people within it. But at the same time, both of these venues are symbols of years of the formative period of my life. I grew up in both of these places and to see them change in any way, shape, or form is terrifying to me. I don’t know how to let go and I’m not sure if I’ll ever be able to do so completely. The owner of Bangarangs (Mad Hatter’s replacement) has stated that they hope to run the establishment better than the Hatter, with several improvements on policies on everything from moshing to pricing. And Southgate Houses’ staff seems excited about the new venue, leading me to believe that big things could be coming down the pipe very soon. But with so much of the situation being untested and uncertain, all I’m left with right now are memories of over half a decade, taking place in venues that will cease to be in a few short days. No matter what the outcome is, however, I will always have my memories: the highs, the lows, the sadness, and the joy. When the final, last call rolls around on New Year’s Eve, I’ll lift my glass to all that was and hope that there is still more to come. If these venues mean anything similar to you, please do the same. Our memories will guarantee that neither venue will every truly die. (A shortened version of this essay ran in CityBeat's "Year in Film and Music" issue, Dec. 21) ...

Getting Over Going Under - Cincinnati CityBeat

Thu, Dec 29, 2011
Southgate House was like a rock. When I worked at Newport on the Levee across the street, I often capped off a night at work with a trip to Southgate. Amidst the sea of fake tans, short skirts and Ed Hardy shirts of Levee visitors, the Southgate House was a haven for authenticity, and I’m not sure that anything can fill that void. When/if someone new takes over the venue and tries, I don’t know if I can ever accept it. There are rumors that Southgate House’s management and staff are opening a new venue in Newport and the old House will receive renovations (possibly remaining a music club). The Mad Hatter is slated to reopen under a new name and owner. I’ve been following the news and rumors swirling around both venues since they arose and began to take shape, but I still cannot pin down my feelings.  On one hand, I agree with legendary local musician David Rhodes Brown and others who have said that it is not a building that creates a community, but the people within it. But at the same time, both of these venues are symbols of the formative years of my life. I grew up in both of these places and to see them change in any way, shape or form is terrifying to me. I don’t know how to let go and I’m not sure if I’ll ever be able to do so completely. No matter what the outcome is, however, I will always have my memories — the highs, the lows, the sadness and the joy. When the final last call rolls around on New Year’s Eve, I’ll lift my glass to all that was and hope that there is still more to come. If these venues mean anything similar to you, please do the same. Our memories will guarantee that neither venue will every truly die. © ...

Upstate entrepreneurs cautiously upbeat - Greenville News

Tue, Nov 1, 2011
By nature, these entrepreneurs are a hardy group. “If I can sell cakes at the economy’s absolute worst, I know I can sell them during better times,” said Andrea Goodjoin, owner of Divine Desserts by Andrea in Greenville. Goodjoin began her cake-baking business in the midst of the last recession, leaving her ...

Upstate entrepreneurs cautiously upbeat - Greenville News

Tue, Nov 1, 2011
By nature, these entrepreneurs are a hardy group. “If I can sell cakes at the economy’s absolute worst, I know I can sell them during better times,” said Andrea Goodjoin, owner of Divine Desserts by Andrea in Greenville. Goodjoin began her cake-baking business in the midst of the last recession, leaving her ...

The Race for Louisiana Lt. Governor: Will Democrats Pick the Winner? - Bayoubuzz

Tue, Oct 11, 2011
Election Day, the race will likely develop into an interesting study of Louisiana’s new political dynamic where Republican will oppose Republican, and Democrats can decide the outcome. By Lawrence Chehardy About Lawrence Chehardy For thirty-four years Lawrence Chehardy served as Assessor of Jefferson Parish and throughout his career has been a champion the maintenance of the Homestead Exemption.  During his years as Assessor Lawrence Chehardy served as President, Vice-president, and Treasure of the Louisiana Assessors’ Association. He also served on numerous boards and committees of the association. Chehardy has extensive knowledge of politics, political campaigning, and the political process. When it comes to political strategy and creating the campaign’s message, Lawrence is one of the best. Lawrence Chehardy has been instrumental in the election of numerous candidates through endorsements as well as campaign strategy. In many cases his endorsement turned the election in favor of those candidates. In addition to his political commentary and public speaking engagements, Lawrence Chehardy is a founding member of the Chehardy, Sherman, Ellis, Murray, Recile, Griffith, Stakelum & Hayes Law Firm and serves as its managing partner. Related Desperate Politics? Nungesser, Dardenne Debate Louisiana Poll Results Louisiana Elections Poll: Dardenne v. Nungesser, Tucker v. Schedler Virtual Ties   Recent columns by Chehardy Obama Jobs Plan Stimulus 2 Is Job On Us And Class Warfare Bobby Jindal and the Demise of the Louisiana Democratic Party The Surge of the Louisiana Republican Party Fielkow’s Resignation And The Politics Of Scheduling Louisiana Elections Roller Coaster...

The Race for Louisiana Lt. Governor: Will Democrats Pick the Winner? - Bayoubuzz

Tue, Oct 4, 2011
Election Day, the race will likely develop into an interesting study of Louisiana’s new political dynamic where Republican will oppose Republican, and Democrats can decide the outcome. By Lawrence Chehardy About Lawrence Chehardy For thirty-four years Lawrence Chehardy served as Assessor of Jefferson Parish and throughout his career has been a champion the maintenance of the Homestead Exemption.  During his years as Assessor Lawrence Chehardy served as President, Vice-president, and Treasure of the Louisiana Assessors’ Association. He also served on numerous boards and committees of the association. Chehardy has extensive knowledge of politics, political campaigning, and the political process. When it comes to political strategy and creating the campaign’s message, Lawrence is one of the best. Lawrence Chehardy has been instrumental in the election of numerous candidates through endorsements as well as campaign strategy. In many cases his endorsement turned the election in favor of those candidates. In addition to his political commentary and public speaking engagements, Lawrence Chehardy is a founding member of the Chehardy, Sherman, Ellis, Murray, Recile, Griffith, Stakelum & Hayes Law Firm and serves as its managing partner. Related Desperate Politics? Nungesser, Dardenne Debate Louisiana Poll Results Louisiana Elections Poll: Dardenne v. Nungesser, Tucker v. Schedler Virtual Ties   Recent columns by Chehardy Obama Jobs Plan Stimulus 2 Is Job On Us And Class Warfare Bobby Jindal and the Demise of the Louisiana Democratic Party The Surge of the Louisiana Republican Party Fielkow’s Resignation And The Politics Of Scheduling Louisiana Elections Roller Coaster...




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