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Waldo, AR  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Waldo, Arkansas. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Lewis Funeral Home Inc
613 North Olive
Waldo , AR 71770
(870) 693-5113
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Myles Bendtsen — Rose Creek

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Ross) Johnson, Rochester, Melanie (Brian) Worrall, Huron, S.D., Dean (Renae) Bendtsen, Rose Creek; siblings, Roma Samuelson, Austin, Ramona Peters, Austin, Alan (Carole) Bendtsen, Madison, Wis., DeWaldon (Trish) Bendtsen, Rochester, Kay (Curtis) Lewison, Adams, Gary (Barb) Bendtsen, Elkton, Karen (Russell) Anderson, Rose Creek, Karol (Jack) Blink, Rochester.He is preceded in death by his parents; sister, Marcine; daughter, Janel Gleason; grandson, Scotty.Special thanks to Ken Kroupa, whose kindness and friendship added greatly to Myles' last year. Also, we thank his devoted sisters and sister-in-law who gave him much time and love. Thanks also to the staff of Our House Memory Care, who never made him feel like a man with dementia — only a man with friends.A Funeral Mass will be celebrated 10 a.m. on Tuesday at St. Peter's Catholic Church in Rose Creek, with Father Thomas Loomis officiating. There will be a 6:30 p.m. wake service today, June 25, at Mayer Funeral Home, where friends may call from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friends may also call one hour before the service at the church on Tuesday. Interment will be in St. Peter's Cemetery.In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred to St. Peter's Catholic Church. (Post Bulletin)

Regional Digest: Rock Cats Win Fourth Straight - Hartford Courant

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Gary Brown hit a solo home run off Darnell. The sixth inning was the big one for the Rock Cats, who scored five runs. Four straight singles with no one out, by Aaron Hicks, Chris Herrmann, Oswaldo Arcia and Chris Colabello accounted for one run and loaded the bases. Bigley cleared them with a double and scored on a single by Rizzotti. The Rock Cats got the final run of the game in the seventh inning on a home run by Colabello, his 12 of the season. Darnell (6-6) went six innings to get the win, giving up three runs on seven hits. He struck out three and walked two. Daniel Turpin pitched three strong innings of relief for the Rock Cats, giving up no runs and two hits and getting his fifth save of the season. He struck out two and walked none. Hartfield Sixth In Trials Former Manchester track standout Mike Hartfield jumped 25 feet, 6 ¾ inches to finish sixth in the long jump at the U.S. Olympic trials in Eugene, Ore., Sunday. Marquise Goodwin, William Claye and George Kitchens Jr. earned the top three spots and the chance to represent the U.S. at the Olympics in London. Goodwin took first place with a jump of 27-4. Hartfield graduated from Manchester in 2008 and is cur...

She Wrote a Nation's Welcome - New York Times

Thu, Jan 5, 2012
Her father published her first book of poetry before she was 18. And though some lines are dewy with Romantic mannerism, the compilation was impressive enough for the 65-year-old Ralph Waldo Emerson to welcome an association with this young poet. (“I should like to be appointed your professor,” he wrote to her, “you being required to attend the whole term.”) It is difficult to sort out the peculiarities of that eccentric relationship, along with several others in which Lazarus combined an acolyte’s submission with prideful assertion. But her ambitions led her to the heart of American literary culture. She visited Walden Pond with Thoreau’s biographer, William Ellery Channing, who presented her with Thoreau’s compass. Walt Whitman’s biographer, John Burroughs, showed the older poet her work (which he praised). Lazarus also found a place in salons, including a Newport-based club overseen by Emily Dickinson’s mentor, Thomas Wentworth Higginson. The exhibition design evokes a weekly New York salon, where a couple who were Lazarus’s lifelong friends, Richard Watson Gilder and his wife, Helena, held court. We learn too of Lazarus’s European travels, where she met Robert Browning, Henry James and William Morris. “Emma Lazarus: Poet of Exiles” is on view through the end of 2012 at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Place, Battery Park City, Lower Manhattan; mjhnyc.org. This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: Correction: January 3, 2012 An earlier version of this review misspelled the surname of Esther Schor as Shor.

Arthur W. Lamb — Brownsdale

Sat, Nov 26, 2011
The funeral service for Arthur Waldo Lamb will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, Nov. 28, 2011, at the Czaplewski Family Funeral Home, 302 Market Street in Brownsdale, with the Rev. Jeff Sage officiating. Interment will be in Dexter Cemetery in Dexter.Visitation will be from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 27, at the Czaplewski Family Funeral Home in Brownsdale, and one hour before the service.Arthur Waldo Lamb, 89, passed away Wednesda... (Post Bulletin)

Stronghurst Graphic - Henderson County Quill

Wed, Nov 16, 2011
Robert Clarke, Stronghurst, Ill.; Mrs. Charles Pogue, Stronghurst, Ill.; William Harold Richey, Prairie City, Ill.; Mrs. John Balridge, Des Moines, Ia.; Thomas A. Richey, Yuma City, Ariz.;; and Mrs. Waldo Spruitt, Traverse City, Mich.? These with the husband, thirteen grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends mourn this deep loss.? All the children mentioned were in attendance at the funeral which was held on May 15th. Her whole life was spent in Henderson County near the place of her birth with the exception of three years they lived in Monmouth to give their children school advantages.? She was a woman of great energy and took an active part in public affairs in the community and in war work.? In her early life she confessed her faith in Christ and untied with the United Presbyterian Church of Walnut Grove, but when the congregation merged with that of Media, Ill., she transferred her membership to it in which connection she remained an active member, taking a leading part in the work of the church, especially of the Women?s Missionary Society in which she filled the office of president and treasurer, always holding an optimistic outlook for the work and was ready to back her words with deeds.? She never failed to show her pastors her hearty appreciation by her presence and earnest prayers. The funeral service was at home with interment in the Walnut Grove Cemetery. ***DR. J. A. BAILEY*** Residents of the community were shocked on Tuesday evening when word circulated that Dr. J. A. Bailey had dropped dead on th...

Read any good personal letters lately? Me neither - The Associated Press

Thu, Oct 20, 2011
He said he sends his mother a hand-written letter about once every four months. Otherwise, Aldrich said he mostly communicates through emails, text messages and Skype with relatives. Bob Cvetic, of Waldorf, Md., a health specialist with a federal law enforcement agency, said different forms of communication have different purposes. "Emails are something quick," he said. "Letters are letters. When I'm writing a letter to a friend, it's a personal note. You can't send an email saying 'hey, sorry to hear you lost your father.'" Mike Stanley of Silver Spring, Md., said he mostly uses the Postal Service to pay bills. He did send his sister a birthday card in August. "I don't send letters. I use the cellphone or email," he said. "It's faster." Even Stanley's mailing of bill payments is no longer the norm, with the post office reporting that, "for the first time, in 2010, fewer than 50 percent of all bills were paid by mail." The Postal Service says the decline in letter-writing is "primarily driven by the adoption of the Internet as a preferred method of communication." The loss of that lucrative first-class mail is just one part of the agency's financial troubles, along with payment of bills via Internet and a decline in other mail. The Postal Service is facing losses of $8 billion or more this year. The loss to what people in the future know about us today may be incalculable. In earlier times the "art" of letter writing was formally taught, explained Newbold. "Letters were the prime medium of communication among individuals and even important in communities as letters were shared, read aloud and published," he said. "Letters did the cultural work that academic journals, book reviews, m...

Read any good personal letters lately? Me neither - The Associated Press

Thu, Oct 20, 2011
He said he sends his mother a hand-written letter about once every four months. Otherwise, Aldrich said he mostly communicates through emails, text messages and Skype with relatives. Bob Cvetic, of Waldorf, Md., a health specialist with a federal law enforcement agency, said different forms of communication have different purposes. "Emails are something quick," he said. "Letters are letters. When I'm writing a letter to a friend, it's a personal note. You can't send an email saying 'hey, sorry to hear you lost your father.'" Mike Stanley of Silver Spring, Md., said he mostly uses the Postal Service to pay bills. He did send his sister a birthday card in August. "I don't send letters. I use the cellphone or email," he said. "It's faster." Even Stanley's mailing of bill payments is no longer the norm, with the post office reporting that, "for the first time, in 2010, fewer than 50 percent of all bills were paid by mail." The Postal Service says the decline in letter-writing is "primarily driven by the adoption of the Internet as a preferred method of communication." The loss of that lucrative first-class mail is just one part of the agency's financial troubles, along with payment of bills via Internet and a decline in other mail. The Postal Service is facing losses of $8 billion or more this year. The loss to what people in the future know about us today may be incalculable. In earlier times the "art" of letter writing was formally taught, explained Newbold. "Letters were the prime medium of communication among individuals and even important in communities as letters were shared, read aloud and published," he said. "Letters did the cultural work that academic journals, book reviews, m...

Guyla Koehler

Mon, Oct 17, 2011
Tulibaski, Kristin, Brecken and Kaven Andres and Kaylee Pesola. Guyla was laid to rest in St. Peter’s Cemetery, New York Mills, Minn.Guyla Jo (Heck) Koehler was born Sept. 28, 1935, in Lewistown, to Waldo and Annis (Gilbreath) Heck. She was a baptized and confirmed member of the Christian faith. In July 1953 she married Ray Delaney. Together they had four children: Tom, David, J. Scott, and Tara. In March 1980, Guyla married Leo Koehler. She passed away in rural New York Mills on Sept. 30, 2011, from injuries suffered in an automobile accident.Guyla was a much-loved wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, aunt and dear friend, whose beautiful heart touched everyone she met. She was salt-of-the-earth to those who knew her. She was humble and unpretentious, one who always took the time say hello, to ask about one’s family, and then listen intently to the answer. She was a caring person who looked and hoped for the best in everyone.Guyla graduated from Fergus High School in Lewistown in 1953, salutatorian of ... (Lewistown News-Argus)

You never write any more; well, hardly anyone does - Atlanta Journal Constitution

Tue, Oct 4, 2011
He said he sends his mother a hand-written letter about once every four months. Otherwise, Aldrich said he mostly communicates through emails, text messages and Skype with relatives. Bob Cvetic, of Waldorf, Md., a health specialist with a federal law enforcement agency, said different forms of communication have different purposes. "Emails are something quick," he said. "Letters are letters. When I'm writing a letter to a friend, it's a personal note. You can't send an email saying 'hey, sorry to hear you lost your father.'" Mike Stanley of Silver Spring, Md., said he mostly uses the Postal Service to pay bills. He did send his sister a birthday card in August. "I don't send letters. I use the cellphone or email," he said. "It's faster." Even Stanley's mailing of bill payments is no longer the norm, with the post office reporting that, "for the first time, in 2010, fewer than 50 percent of all bills were paid by mail." The Postal Service says the decline in letter-writing is "primarily driven by the adoption of the Internet as a preferred method of communication." The loss of that lucrative first-class mail is just one part of the agency's financial troubles, along with payment of bills via Internet and a decline in other mail. The Postal Service is facing losses of $8 billion or more this year. The loss to what people in the future know about us today may be incalculable. In earlier times the "art" of letter writing was formally taught, explained Newbold. "Letters were the prime medium of communication among individuals and even important in communities as letters were shared, read aloud and published," he said. "Letters did the cultural work that academic journals, book reviews, magazines, legal documents, business memos, diplomatic cables, etc. do now. They were also obviously important in more intimate senses, among family, close friends, lovers, and suitors in initiating and preserving personal relationships and holding things together when distance was a real and unsurmountable obstacle." "It's too early to tell with any certainty whether people are using email, texting, Twitter tweets, Facebook status updates, and so on in the same ways that we earlier relied on the letter for; they are probably using each of these media in different ways, some of which allow people to get closer to each other and engage in friendly or intimate exchange. It seems that email is the most letter-like medium," added Newbold. But Aaron Sachs, a professor of American Studies and History at Cornell University, said, "One of the ironies for me is that everyone talks about electronic media bringing people closer together, and I think this is a way we wind up more separate. We don't have the intimacy that we have when we go to the attic and read grandma's letters." "Part of the reason I like being a historian is the sensory experience we have when dealing with old documents" and letters, he said. "Sometimes, when people ask me what I do, I say I read other people's mail." "Handwriting is an aspect of people's identity," he added. "Back in the day, when you wrote a letter it was to that one person, so people said very intimate things." Today with things like Facebook being more public people may not say as much, he said. And while some people are open in what they email, "it's a very different kind of sharing." Said history professor Jeff...




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