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Fortuna, CA  Funeral Homes

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Fortuna Cemetery District
3315 Newburg Road
Fortuna , CA 95540
(707) 725-6459
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Shields roughed up in the Bronx, loses to Yanks - Wilkes Barre Times-Leader

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Martin connected for his fourth career grand slam. "I always prepare myself that the throw is going to be short," Pena said. "On that play I did my best to pick it for him, us. Unfortunately it was between a short throw and a short hop and I didn't get it." Shields was 5-12 with 4.39 ERA in 23 starts against the Yankees and 2-7 with a 5.00 ERA at Yankee Stadium coming in. He gave up a season-high seven runs five earned and seven hits in five innings this time and has lost his last three decisions. "He was not as sharp as we normally see him," Maddon said of Shields. "I think he was over-trying on his part, just not pitching to the spots that he normally does when he is going good." NOTES: Matsui is wearing No. 35 with the Rays in part to honor former Yankees teammate Mike Mussina. "Hopefully I can end my career with the kind of numbers and performance that Mussina had," Matsui said. Mussina, who wore No. 35 most of his career, won 20 games in his final season. ... Longoria (left hamstring), who has been on the disabled list May 1, is close to going out on a rehab assignment. Maddon said he is doing baseball activities and is with the team in New York. Associated Press...

Driver's drowsiness blamed for Bronx bus crash that killed 15 - Los Angeles Times

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
More than 30 people were injured. “Fatigue and speed are an especially lethal combination,” NTSB Chairman Deborah A. P. Hersman said in a statement. “Unfortunately, in investigation after investigation, we are seeing the tragic results of fatigue, which can degrade every aspect of human performance.” Representatives for the now-defunct company that operated the bus, World Wide Travel of Greater New York, could not be reached for comment. The tragedy was “one of the deadliest crashes the NTSB has ever investigated,” Hersman said, and one of four major motor coach accidents on American highways in the last year. The others were a crash in New Hampshire with multiple injuries, a rollover in Doswell, Va., that killed four people and a tour bus crash on the New Jersey Turnpike that killed the driver and one passenger. A list of recommendations for federal agencies could change safety standards across the country for motor coaches, as buses designed for long-distance travel are known. The recommendations include mandatory seat belts, on-board monitoring systems and more extensive background checks for potential drivers. In the past, federal agencies have enacted more than 80% of the safety board’s recommendations, NTSB spokesman Peter Knudson said. The motor coach industry transport...

Council members push to place library backers' initiative on ... - San Jose Mercury News

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Allen said he hopes Reed and his "coalition'' of budget hawks on the council won't "play politics'' with what he calls an "ethical and moral issue.'' "Unfortunately, the city made a mistake with the handling of the petition, but the fortunate thing is that the city has an opportunity to rectify this,'' said Joseph Okpaku, a spokesman for Councilman Kalra. "This is not about the merits of the petitition, but rather about the fairness of the process.'' Contact Tracy Seipel at 408 275-0140.

Bob Dearth — Monroe, Wis.

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Being born to impoverished tenant farmers in the Great Depression, Bob felt a moral obligation to share from his business success with those less fortunate. The local United Way chose to feature Bob and Shirley on their 2009 campaign brochure cover, and for their 50th wedding anniversary they hosted a party for 350 local needy children, including not just a day of fun, food, and entertainment, but also a new warm winter coat for each child.Bob’s generosity was mostly private, sometimes anonymous, frequently spontaneous, and was the great source of inner joy and outward pride in his life.He will be deeply missed by his friends and family. (Post Bulletin)

Earl Scruggs dead at 88 - Newsday

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
There was nothing jokey about the way Scruggs attacked his "fancy five-string banjo," as Opry announcer George D. Hayes called it. In a performance broadcast to much of the country but unfortunately lost to history, he scorched the earth and instantly changed country music. With Monroe on mandolin and Flatt on guitar, the pace was a real jolt to attendees and radio listeners far away, and in some ways the speed and volume he laid down predicted the power of electric music. Tut Taylor, a friend of the Scruggs family who heard that first performance on the radio in his Georgia home, called it an unbelievably raucous moment "a lot like some of the rock 'n' roll things they had, you know. But this was a new sound. It was a pretty sound and a welcome sound." Scruggs' use of three fingers — in place of the limited clawhammer style once prevalent — elevated the banjo from a part of the rhythm section — or a even a comedian's prop — to a lead instrument that was as versatile as the guitar and far more flashy. Country great Porter Wagoner probably summed up Scruggs' importance best of all: "I always felt like Earl was to the five-string banjo what Babe Ruth was to baseball. He is the best there ever was, and the best there ever will be." His string-bending and lead runs became known worldwide as "the Scruggs picking style" and the versatility it allowed has helped popularize the banjo beyond the traditional bluegrass and country forms. Today the banjo can be found in almost any genre, largely due to the way he freed its players to experiment and find new space. That was exactly what Ralph Stanley had in mind when he first heard Scruggs lay it down. A legendary banjo player in his own right, Stanley said in a 2011 interview that he was inspired by Scruggs when he first heard him over the radio after returning home from military service in Germany. "I wasn't doing any playing," Stanley said. "When I got discharged I began listening to Bill and Earl was with him. I already had a banjo at that time, but of course I wanted to do the three-finger roll. I knew Earl was the best, but I didn't want to sound like him. I wanted to do that style, but I wanted to sound the way I felt and that's what I tried to do." Dave Rawlings, a Nashville singer-songwriter and producer, says Scruggs remains every bit as influential and fresh seven decades later. He said it's impossible to imagine nearly every guitar player mimicking Jimi Hendrix, but with Scruggs and the banjo, that's the reality. "The breadth and clarity of the instrument was increased so much," he said. "He invented a style that ...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to do a cleanup. His 6-year-old son, Jonathan, was diagnosed this spring with having an elevated level of lead in his body. “That was the last straw,” Shefton said. He’s in the process of selling his home. The family moved to another neighborhood last week. “Somebody needs to take care of this problem, or inform the people in this neighborhood,” he said. Concerns surfaced over a decade ago Most of the nation’s lead factories — some huge manufacturing complexes and others tiny storefront melting shops — had been largely shuttered by the 1970s and 1980s. Often known as smelters, they emitted thousands of pounds of lead and other toxic metal particles into the air as they melted down batteries and other products containing lead. The particles would land on nearby properties, potentially mixing with lead dust from automobile exhaust or paint chips — significant sources, says the government — to create a hazard. Children who play in lead-contaminated soil, sticking dust-covered hands or toys in their mouths, over time can suffer lost intelligence and other irreversible health problems. In April 2001, environmental scientist William Eckel published a research article in the American Journal of Public Health warning about the dangers of old smelting factories. While working on his Ph.D. dissertation, Eckel had identified a historical smelting site unknown to federal and state regulators and wondered how many other sites had been forgotten over time, their buildings demolished or absorbed by other businesses. Eckel used old industry directories, which he cross-referenced with EPA databases, to come up with a list of more than 400 potential lead-smelting sites that appeared to be unknown to federal regulators. (Page 4 of 13) Eckel confirmed that 20 of the sites’ addresses were factories -- and not just business offices -- using Sanborn fire insurance maps, which detail the historical uses of individual pieces of property. Another 86 sites were specifically listed in directories as “plant” locations. He paid to have soil samples tested from three sites in Baltimore and five in Philadelphia. All but one of the samples exceeded the EPA’s residential hazard level for lead in areas where children play. Eckel’s article warned that the findings “should create some sense of urgency for the investigation of the other sites identified here because they may represent a significant source of exposure to lead in their local environments.” The research i...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to do a cleanup. His 6-year-old son, Jonathan, was diagnosed this spring with having an elevated level of lead in his body. “That was the last straw,” Shefton said. He’s in the process of selling his home. The family moved to another neighborhood last week. “Somebody needs to take care of this problem, or inform the people in this neighborhood,” he said. Concerns surfaced over a decade ago Most of the nation’s lead factories — some huge manufacturing complexes and others tiny storefront melting shops — had been largely shuttered by the 1970s and 1980s. Often known as smelters, they emitted thousands of pounds of lead and other toxic metal particles into the air as they melted down batteries and other products containing lead. The particles would land on nearby properties, potentially mixing with lead dust from automobile exhaust or paint chips — significant sources, says the government — to create a hazard. Children who play in lead-contaminated soil, sticking dust-covered hands or toys in their mouths, over time can suffer lost intelligence and other irreversible health problems. In April 2001, environmental scientist William Eckel published a research article in the American Journal of Public Health warning about the dangers of old smelting factories. While working on his Ph.D. dissertation, Eckel had identified a historical smelting site unknown to federal and state regulators and wondered how many other sites had been forgotten over time, their buildings demolished or absorbed by other businesses. Eckel used old industry directories, which he cross-referenced with EPA databases, to come up with a list of more than 400 potential lead-smelting sites that appeared to be unknown to federal regulators. (Page 4 of 13) Eckel confirmed that 20 of the sites’ addresses were factories -- and not just business offices -- using Sanborn fire insurance maps, which detail the historical uses of individual pieces of property. Another 86 sites were specifically listed in directories as “plant” locations. He paid to have soil samples tested from three sites in Baltimore and five in Philadelphia. All but one of the samples exceeded the EPA’s residential hazard level for lead in areas where children play. Eckel’s article warned that the findings “should create some sense of urgency for the investigation of the other sites identified here because they may represent a significant source of exposure to lead in their local environments.” The research i...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to do a cleanup. His 6-year-old son, Jonathan, was diagnosed this spring with having an elevated level of lead in his body. “That was the last straw,” Shefton said. He’s in the process of selling his home. The family moved to another neighborhood last week. “Somebody needs to take care of this problem, or inform the people in this neighborhood,” he said. Concerns surfaced over a decade ago Most of the nation’s lead factories — some huge manufacturing complexes and others tiny storefront melting shops — had been largely shuttered by the 1970s and 1980s. Often known as smelters, they emitted thousands of pounds of lead and other toxic metal particles into the air as they melted down batteries and other products containing lead. The particles would land on nearby properties, potentially mixing with lead dust from automobile exhaust or paint chips — significant sources, says the government — to create a hazard. Children who play in lead-contaminated soil, sticking dust-covered hands or toys in their mouths, over time can suffer lost intelligence and other irreversible health problems. In April 2001, environmental scientist William Eckel published a research article in the American Journal of Public Health warning about the dangers of old smelting factories. While working on his Ph.D. dissertation, Eckel had identified a historical smelting site unknown to federal and state regulators and wondered how many other sites had been forgotten over time, their buildings demolished or absorbed by other businesses. Eckel used old industry directories, which he cross-referenced with EPA databases, to come up with a list of more than 400 potential lead-smelting sites that appeared to be unknown to federal regulators. (Page 4 of 13) Eckel confirmed that 20 of the sites’ addresses were factories -- and not just business offices -- using Sanborn fire insurance maps, which detail the historical uses of individual pieces of property. Another 86 sites were specifically listed in directories as “plant” locations. He paid to have soil samples tested from three sites in Baltimore and five in Philadelphia. All but one of the samples exceeded the EPA’s residential hazard level for lead in areas where children play. Eckel’s article warned that the findings “should create some sense of urgency for the investigation of the other sites identified here because they may represent a significant source of exposure to lead in their local environments.” The research i...

Mike Connell: End of the Underground Railroad - Port Huron Times Herald

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Rev. Thompson in St. Clair. Paris was born in Kentucky in 1824. Her father was a slave, but her mother had been born free and desperately wanted the same for her children. Unfortunately, the man who owned Malinda’s father insisted the children were his property and sought to enslave them. «« »» MALINDA’S MOTHER tried to buy her husband’s freedom, but she could not raise the $1,500 asking price. Rather than risk their children’s freedom, the parents made a heart-wrenching choice, a story retold by the St. Clair Republican on Oct. 27, 1892, when it published Malinda’s obituary. (Page 3 of 5) “He urged her to take the children and go north, choosing to die there alone in slavery rather than run the risk of having them stolen from her,” the newspaper reported. “She finally did so, taking her departure in the night, her husband, unknown to his master, accompanying them nine miles of the way. “They then knelt together and prayed and sang a parting hymn, and the father turned back alone to end his life a slave, while the faithful mother hurriedly bore her children onward to a place of safety. “They never met again on earth.” «« »» THE WARD BROTHERS, among the foremost pioneers of St. Clair County, also were staunch abolitionists. Eber Ward, who worked for a time as lighthouse keeper at Fort Gratiot, made his views on slavery clear in Kentucky in 1817. “Can a merciful Jehovah sit on his throne and view the sufferings, the tears, the prayers of those desponding slaves?” he asked. His brother, Sam Ward, the founder of Newport — or Marine City as we know it today — did not hesitate to hire blacks to work on the steamers built at his shipyard at the mouth of the Belle River. Nor did Eber’s son, Eber Brock Ward, who was sent to work as a cabin boy in a schooner at age 9 after his mother’s death. “By the time he was full grown, he knew everything about a ship from keel to flag, and had bought a small vessel of his own,” historian Herbert Newton Casson wrote in his 1907 study of the early American steel industry. “For years he continued to buy ships, or build them, until he became the steamship king of the Great Lakes.” «« »» THE YOUNGER WARD and Thompson became fast friends, and they swung into action when a Southern slave hunter came searching for an escaped slave who worked as a chef on one of Ward’s boats. Ward bought his employee’s freedom and helped the chef raise the money he would need to buy the freedom of his enslaved wife and children. Jenks said it was Thompson who traveled south, paid for the chef’s wife and children, and then escorted them to Michigan and a life of freedom. (Page 4 of 5) Thompson also played a role in the anti-slavery struggle of Bleeding Kansas, as the strife-torn territory became known in the 1850s. Jenks said Thompson helped recruit and arm a company of fighters from the East to fight pro-slavery forces in Lawrence, Kansas. His old neighbor, John Brown, bloodied his hands in Kansas. It’s what inspired his audacious plan to steal weapons from the arsenal at Harpers Ferry, which he intended to use for a slave insurrection in Virginia. Brown came to Chatham, Ontario, about 30 miles from Marine City, to recruit volunteers for the Harpers Ferry expedition. It would not surprise me to learn that Thompson joined Brown there, although I can find no documentation of it. «« »» IN THE PRESIDENTIAL election of 1844, James Birney of the abolitionist Liberty Party received a single vote in St. Clair County. Thompson proudly boasted that vote was his. Birney, a Kentuckian who moved to Bay City in the early 1840s, received less than 3% of the vote nationally. Even so, many historians believe he swung the election from the Whig candidate, Henry Clay, to James K. Polk, a Democrat. If so, it changed history. Clay opposed the annexation of Texas and the...

Gary and Betty Jo Glenn are dedicated supporters of the Boys Home of the South ... - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 1, 2012
The boys who go there learn independent living. They learn cooking and laundry. It’s remarkable, the skills they learn in a short time there,” she says. “Children can’t help themselves. I was fortunate to have a great home life; Gary was not. The average person might not be aware that plenty of children are removed from homes every week, and it happens to families in all walks of life,” Betty Jo adds. Glenn often combines his love for the youngsters at the Boys Home with his love for stock car racing, his primarily hobby. Each summer, he’s made it possible for Boy’s Home residents to attend races at Greenville-Pickens Speedway. “It’s just a little thing. But you’d be surprised how many of these kids have never seen a race. They just don’t get to do the little things that children in traditional family units experience on a regular basis. I guess that’s why we like to help a little bit.” The Boys Home, which provides a homelike setting for 60 to 65 young men year-round, gets its biggest help of the year from its Spring Soiree. The 12th annual event is scheduled for 6 p.m. May 3 at Embassy Suites. “You’ll see a lot of people there you know but didn’t know that they help the Boys Home,” says Glenn. “It’s a fun evening, one of my favorite nights of the year.” The event will include a dinner, program, silent auction and live auction. The event often features a Boys Home alumnus as the speaker, and all sponsorship dollars go to the care of the residents. For more information, contact Susan Spitzer at susan.spitzer@boyshomeofthesouth.org ...




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